Author: colleenrobinson

Invasive insects and disease awareness month

Vin Vasive is the spokesman for invasive insects at USDA APHIS. He is made up of invasive species. This USDA APHIS poster was designed by Deb Levy Creative.

Vin Vasive is the spokesman for invasive insects at USDA APHIS. He is made up of invasive species. This USDA APHIS poster was designed by Deb Levy Creative.

April is invasive plant pest and disease awareness month, and May 21-27 is EAB awareness week.

It’s spring, and a good time to remember that invasive species can be easily moved long distances by unsuspecting citizens; maybe even you! All it takes to potentially start a new infestation is to move things we often like to take with us, but don’t know are a problem:

  • firewood,
  • infected or infested plant material,
  • an infected or infested piece of fruit, or
  • even a decorative piece of northwoods style furniture that hasn’t been properly treated to kill pests hiding inside.

Take a moment to think about whether you are unknowingly moving items that could harbor pests. The Hungry Pests website lists things you can do to prevent the spread of invasive species, whether you’re a birdwatcher, gardener, hunter, logger, or anyone. Check it out! While you’re there check out some short videos of their “spokesman” Vin Vasive, who has gotten much creepier over the years. 

Help spread the word

Coming up, May 21-27 is emerald ash borer awareness week, which is right before the Memorial Day holiday, when lots of travelling, camping, and opening up of summer cabins occurs. The Don’t Move Firewood website has a nice video of how to identify an EAB infested tree. More detailed videos are also available at dnr.wi.gov, keyword “forest health.” If you would like some examples of outreach tools or publications you can use to promote EAB awareness, check out the Don’t Move Firewood website; there you’ll find games for kids, an EAB craft project, videos, press releases, and news articles from past years. 

Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172. Categories: FH, UF. Tags: Statewide FH, Insect, Pest

DNR will conduct aerial spraying for gypsy moth in Madison, Monona and at Devils Lake State Park

Aerial spraying for gypsy moth is done by a loud, low flying airplane beginning early in the morning.

Spray aircraft used in gypsy moth control.

Residents in the Madison and Baraboo areas can expect a morning or two of loud, low-flying planes this May. The DNR Gypsy Moth Suppression Program will be spraying to control high populations of gypsy moth, an invasive and destructive pest whose caterpillars feed on the leaves of many tree and shrub species. Aerial spraying will occur in the following locations:

  • Cities of Madison and Monona: Three sites in and around Orton Park, Quaker Park, and Acewood/Elvehjem Parks
  • Devils Lake State Park: Day-use area at the south end of the lake, and the day-use area and several campgrounds at the north end of the lake.

Maps of the treatment areas can also be seen at the Wisconsin Cooperative Gypsy Moth Program website. Spraying is currently predicted to occur in mid-May, but actual dates will depend on weather conditions and caterpillar development.

Continue reading “DNR will conduct aerial spraying for gypsy moth in Madison, Monona and at Devils Lake State Park”

Amur cork tree is an emerging threat to Wisconsin forests.

Amur cork tree (Phellodendron amurense) is a relatively new invasive plant found in at least four Wisconsin counties. It is classified as Prohibited under Wisconsin’s invasive species law, NR 40. The female cork tree cannot be possessed, transferred, transported or introduced in Wisconsin. We ask that you report this tree to DNR because it is invasive here and in other states and DNR is mounting control efforts before it becomes widespread. DNR works with property owners to achieve this by providing advice, tools and resource opportunities. Continue reading “Amur cork tree is an emerging threat to Wisconsin forests.”

Wind and hail damage caused by the April 9, 2017 storm

The National Weather Service local storm reports map shows hail was most commonly reported, with some tree damage, and one tornado (west of Wausau).

The National Weather Service local storm reports map shows hail was most commonly reported, with some tree damage, and one tornado (west of Wausau).

During the night of April 9-10, 2017 a strong line of storms moved through Wisconsin. Reports ranged from pea sized to tennis ball sized hail, with most stating quarter sized hail. Immediately following the hail, winds picked up and straight line winds took down trees in a number of areas around Oneida and Vilas Counties. The National Weather Service reports that there was a tornado touch down west of Wausau, and reports of tree damage showed up in the National Weather Service’s local storm reporting page.

Damage to trees from hail was most noticeable on the conifers which had needles knocked off, creating a green carpet below the trees. Fine twigs on white pines were damaged by the hail and some fine branch mortality may occur if the twigs were damaged badly enough. Damaged red pine may be more prone to getting diplodia where the twigs were wounded.

Hail wounds on fine branches of white pine appear as dents with cracks in the bark. Those cracks will dry further as spring progresses and the cracked areas will increase slightly in size.

April 9 hail wounds on white pine branches (yellow arrows) appear small but will dry, and the bark will crack further as spring progresses. Some branch dieback may occur.

Hail wounds on young aspen and the fine branches of mature aspen from the April 9-10 storm appear as scuffed bark (yellow arrows). These will callus over relatively quickly.

April 9 hail wounds on young aspen and the fine branches of mature aspen appear as scuffed bark (yellow arrows). These will callus over relatively quickly.

Small wounds on young aspen should callus over.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172. 

Forest tent caterpillar egg mass surveys indicate low populations again

Newly hatched forest tent caterpillars with the egg mass they emerged from. Egg masses are laid in mid-summer and remain on the tree through the winter.

Newly hatched forest tent caterpillars with the egg mass they emerged from. Egg masses are laid in mid-summer and remain on the tree through the winter.

Low numbers of forest tent caterpillar egg masses were found recently during surveys in Vilas and Oneida Counties. Forest tent caterpillar is a native insect that has periodic outbreaks. Our last outbreak was from 1999-2002, and they typically have outbreaks every 10-15 years. Last year I noticed a few more caterpillars than the previous year, but there was no noticeable defoliation. So far egg mass surveys indicate another year of low populations, although there may be areas with locally higher populations. Forest tent caterpillar eggs will start hatching soon, timed to closely match the emergence of aspen leaves.

Eastern tent caterpillars hatch from eggs and immediately start to create a web nest. Young caterpillars are shown on a small web nest.

Eastern tent caterpillars hatch from eggs and immediately start to create a web nest. Young caterpillars are shown on a small nest.

Eastern tent caterpillars do not follow a typical outbreak pattern and tend to be present at some low level every year. They create web nests early in the spring, preferring black cherry trees, crabapple trees, or other stone fruits. When webs are small the caterpillars can be easily crushed or sprayed. As webs get bigger you may have to use a rake to pull them out of the tree. It is not necessary to prune the branch out of the tree. Doing so will actually cause more damage to the tree than the defoliation caused by the caterpillars, because trees can more easily send out additional leaves than grow a branch to replace one you prune out. Please do not burn nests out of the trees as this could start a wildfire. 

 

Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172.

 

Emerald ash borer new locations in Wisconsin

EAB quarantine map. Counties shaded in tan are quarantined for EAB, and includes much of the southern half of Wisconsin, as well as other counties. Areas shaded in green are the townships and municipalities where EAB has actually been identified, and shows that not all counties that are quarantined are fully infested.

EAB quarantine and detections map. Counties shaded in tan are quarantined for EAB, green areas are townships and municipalities where EAB has actually been identified.

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) continues to be found in new areas. Wisconsin continues to track EAB at the municipality or township level; quarantined counties are shown in tan and known infested areas are shown in green on the map.

If you know you have EAB, please contact us with that information so we can verify the infestation and update the maps. If your area:

  • is not shaded in green on the map please contact DNR or
  • is not shaded at all on the map please contact DATCP.

You can reach both agencies from the menu options when you call 1-800-462-2803.

New county quarantines

  • none

New finds in counties already quarantined

  • Adams/Columbia/Juneau/Sauk counties — city of Wisconsin Dells
  • Brown County — village of Allouez
  • Crawford County – town of Bridgeport
  • Columbia County – town of Lowville
  • Columbia/Dodge counties – village of Randolph
  • Dane County – village of DeForest
  • Green County – town of Monroe
  • Jackson County — towns of Melrose and North Bend
  • Jefferson County – towns of Aztalan, Farmington, Hebron, and Sumner
  • La Crosse County – town of Shelby
  • Monroe County – city of Sparta
  • Rock County – towns of Clinton, Harmony, Johnstown, and Lima
  • Sheboygan County – village of Kohler
  • Trempealeau County — towns of Ettrick, Gale and Preston

 Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172.

 

Emerald ash borer trapping in 2017

The Wisconsin DNR forest health team is planning to trap for emerald ash borer (EAB) at 20 locations in 2017.

Emerald ash borer traps will be placed at 12 locations in northwest Wisconsin in 2017: Big Bay State Park, Amnicon Falls State Park, Pattison State Park, Brule River State Forest, Governor Knowles State Forest, Interstate State Park, Willow River State Park, Eau Claire, Smith Lake County Park, Flambeau River State Forest, Big Falls County Park, and Pershing State Wildlife Area.

EAB trap locations in northwest Wisconsin in 2017.

Emerald ash borer traps will be placed at 8 locations in northwest Wisconsin in 2017: Northern Highlands American Legion State Forest, Governor Thompson State Park, Hartman Creek State Park, Poygan Marsh Wildlife Area, River Side Park, Princeton, Dodge Memorial Park, and Grand River Marsh Wildlife Area.

EAB trap locations in northeast Wisconsin in 2017.

Traps will mostly be placed on state properties. A couple traps will be placed on county land where state properties are not in the local area. Traps are deployed close to 400 growing degree days so they are ready when EAB adults start emerging at approximately 450 degree days. In 2016, southern Wisconsin hit 450 degrees days (modified base 50°F) in late May.

Written by: Mike Hillstrom, forest health specialist, Wisconsin Dells (Michael.Hillstrom@Wisconsin.gov), 715-459-1371.

Emerald ash borer trapping by a few northern county forestry departments

Douglas, Oneida, and Sawyer County Forestry Departments will be trapping emerald ash borer on select sites across their properties this year. As needed, the DNR Forest Health Program and the Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) will provide guidance to county forest departments that are responsible for purchasing, installing and monitoring their EAB purple prism traps.

Any new EAB detections will be tracked at the state level and may be used by forest managers to prioritize stand management based on EAB proximity, and by communities to inform the timing of ash management in community forests.

The abundance of ash forest resources and limited known distribution of EAB in the state’s north spurred interest by these counties to continue trapping.

Written by Paul Cigan, forest health specialist, Hayward (Paul.Cigan@Wisconsin.gov), 715-416-4920.