Forest benefits

Help your heart by planting trees

February is American Heart Month. Get heart healthy the easy way, head outside! Exposure to trees relaxes and restores your mind, lowering your blood pressure and heart rate. This helps to reduce incidences of cardiovascular and lower respiratory diseases. Conversely, tree loss from the spread of the emerald ash borer, and other insects and diseases, is associated with increased mortality related to cardiovascular and lower respiratory diseases.

walking in park Continue reading “Help your heart by planting trees”

Trees help achieve resolutions to be healthy

The sedentary lifestyle has become more common, and the shift has been costly. One result is an increase in obesity. Childhood obesity rates have tripled (12–19 years old) or quadrupled (6–11 years old,) and adult rates have doubled since the 1970s. Obesity increases risk of chronic diseases and conditions such as: high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, gallbladder disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea, cancer and mental illness. This rise in chronic diseases related to obesity results in billions of dollars in medical costs and lost productivity each year. Continue reading “Trees help achieve resolutions to be healthy”

Improve mental health with exposure to trees and nature

If stress about the upcoming holiday season is beginning to build, put on your coat and hat, get yourself outside and walk around under your neighborhood trees. Exposure to nature reduces depression, anxiety and stress! Time spent in nature provides a wealth of mental health benefits. Continue reading “Improve mental health with exposure to trees and nature”

Getting active in Wisconsin’s urban forest

Wisconsin Active Together logoBy Rob Fontella, fontella@wisc.edu, healthTIDE UW-Madison Public Health

As the weather gets warmer, Wisconsinites are getting out there and enjoying their community and the natural areas the state has to offer. Recently a new effort was launched to encourage communities in Wisconsin to become part of a campaign recognizing the community’s efforts to promote active lifestyles. Continue reading “Getting active in Wisconsin’s urban forest”

Women of WWOA Spring Gathering May 5th

Wisconsin Woodland Owners Association group of women landowners aka The Women of WWOA, was created to offer educational activities and a supportive atmosphere for women landowners to learn more about caring for their woodlands. The group gathers two to three times a year to spend a day learning from each other and natural resource professionals.

The next gathering will be Saturday, May 5th form 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at Mueller’s Quarry Tree Farm in Arcadia, WI.

Get ready for a fun day of learning, walking, listening, and sharing…

  • Walking the land with UW-Extension Assistant Professor Geology, Jay Zambito. He is currently conducting research in the Arcadia Driftless Area
  • Hot picnic lunch- yum!
  • Meghan Jensen, WDNR Conservation Warden in Trempealeau County will discuss her work and answer questions about woodland concerns.
  • Afternoon sampling in erosion retention ponds with UW-Extension’s Randy Mell.

Part of the day will be indoors and part outside, so dress comfortably for both. Think woods casual- jeans, boots, long sleeves, rain gear, hat, etc.

$20/person includes materials, breaks and lunch. Click here to register.

#FridaysOnTheFarm

Planning Boosts Forest Health and Management

From the kitchen table to the boardroom table, the USDA brings people together across the nation for: healthier food, natural resources and people; a stronger agricultural industry; and economic growth, jobs and innovation.

Each Friday, meet those farmers, producers and landowners through their #Fridaysonthefarm stories. Visit local farms, ranches, forests and resource areas where USDA customers and partners do right and feed everyone.

Click here to read the full story about Jay and Mike Carlson, a father-son team working with NRCS in the Driftless Area to identify management goals that are helping improve the way they manage their forests and its health.

Photo: Honey bees are pollinating wildflowers on the Carlson’s property.

Another productive year for WI Urban Forestry!

By Jeff Roe, Urban Forestry Team Leader

urban forestry teamAs I reflect on the last year, what stands out most for me is the great people that I work with – both staff and partners!

This has been a year of change, with new structures and leadership within the agency. Nonetheless, the staff dedication and leadership support for our program, and the work we do, remain strong. We have also had some staff changes this year: we added a new coordinator to the team, Brad Johnson, to serve the West Central area of the state; Bobbi and Dan joined the team to help with grants and the urban assessment program, respectively; and later in the year, Bobbi moved on to a full-time position within another DNR program. Continue reading “Another productive year for WI Urban Forestry!”

Healthcare facilities using green spaces to help in healing

Imagine taking a relaxing walk in a wooded area, listening to the sounds of wind through trees, birds, and water running down a stream and seeing beautiful, vibrant shade of green. This type of an environment has shown numerous benefits, from cleaner air and water to increased health benefits like reduced stress and blood pressure. Continue reading “Healthcare facilities using green spaces to help in healing”

Wisconsin Community Tree Map release

The DNR’s Urban Forestry program is excited to unveil a mapping application which provides a new way of viewing and learning about trees in your community. Wisconsin Community Tree Map is a browser-based application that maps community tree inventories. This means no special software is needed to run the application. Continue reading “Wisconsin Community Tree Map release”