Woodland owners

Emerald ash borer detected in Kewaunee County

Communities known to have emerald ash borer as of September 2018 are shown in green, with Kewaunee County highlighted in red. Modified from a map by the Wisconsin Dept. of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP).

Communities known to have emerald ash borer as of September 2018 are shown in green, with Kewaunee County highlighted in red. Modified from a map by the Wisconsin Dept. of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP).

By Bill McNee, forest health specialist, Oshkosh. Bill.McNee@wisconsin.gov; 920-360-0942

In August, two separate infestations of emerald ash borer (EAB) were found in rural areas of Kewaunee County. EAB has spread through Wisconsin over the last few years, so these detections were expected. The first infestation spans the towns of Carlton and Franklin in the southern part of the county. A county resident reported the second infestation, located in the Town of Casco, in late August. The pest is likely present in other parts of the county as well.

Oak in the Driftless Workshop

Saturday, September 29, 2018  •  UW-Baraboo/Sauk County

This landowner workshop will cover a wide range of topics centered on the idea that oaks, today and in the future, are a shared resource important to people and wildlife in the Driftless Area in southwestern Wisconsin.

Learn from field experts about the many topics around oak during the morning session and continue discussions at lunch (provided); see some of these practices in action during the afternoon session when you to visit one of several woodland properties actively managing oak.

Topics include
• Oak ecology
• Improving wildlife habitat
• Planting trees
• Controlling invasive species
• Properly harvesting trees
• Understanding what your trees are worth
• and much more!

Cost is just $25 (Individual), $40 (Couple)
Hurry! These early-bird rates end August 19th.
Register online now.

Woodland owners annual meeting

The 39th annual meeting of the Wisconsin Woodland Owners Association will be September 20-23, 2018 at the Potawatomi Carter Casino and Hotel in Wabeno, Wisconsin.

Join WWOA in northeast Wisconsin and experience all the fun tours and interesting presenters that the Phoenix Falls Chapter members have created for all to enjoy!

Come for a tour or stay for the whole weekend – there a variety of registration options. 

  • Learn a wealth of information from speakers, members, and exhibitors
  • Participate in a variety of exciting and interesting field tours
  • Get ideas to improve your woodland
  • Meet people and organizations who can be a resource for your next woodland activity
  • Broaden your knowledge of the value of sound forest management

Registration for the 2018 Annual Meeting is now available!  Visit this page for descriptions of tours and speakers.

Tree Farm Field Day on August 11

Tree Farmers Dale and Cathy Paulson

Dale and Cathy Paulson, land stewards and 2017 Outstanding Tree Farmers of the Year

The Wisconsin Tree Farm Committee invites you to attend their 2018 Annual Field Day on Saturday, August 11 2018 in Bayfield County in northwest Wisconsin.

Take a 3-hour walking tour of young forest habitat, regenerating woodlands and successional forest along a trout stream as you stroll Dale and Cathy Paulson’s 131-acre tree farm. On this property the Paulsons harvest saw logs and pulpwood, protect the trout stream, keep bees, garden and create works of art in their woodworking shop. Return to the Town of Bell Community Center in Cornucopia, WI for lunch, natural resources displays and programs, and silent auction.

PLEASE REGISTER BY AUGUST 3rd.

Registration is required and covers lunch, refreshments, bus transportation to and from the Community Center in the Town of Bell, and a field tour booklet. Cost: $20/person, $30/couple. For more information and to register visit this site.

Forest health zones restructured

by Jodie Ellis, communications specialist, Forest Health team (Madison)
Jodie.Ellis@Wisconsin.gov; 608-266-2172

The number of Forest Health (FH) specialist positions in the state was recently reduced by one, going from seven fulltime positions to six. To reflect this change, the forest health zonal map was restructured to spread coverage between five forest health specialists (the FH specialist position for the Central zone, while not eliminated, remains vacant). The new assignments went into effect on April 3, 2018.

To contact a forest health specialist, please refer to the revised map below:

  • Northwest zone: Paul Cigan (Hayward), 715-416-4920, paul.cigan@wisconsin.gov
  • Northeast zone: Linda Williams (Woodruff), 715-356-5211 x232, Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov. Also covering Lincoln, Shawano, Menominee, Waupaca and Oconto counties in the Central zone
  • West Central zone: Todd Lanigan (Eau Claire), 715-839-1632, todd.lanigan@wisconsin.gov. Also covering Taylor County in the Central zone.
  • Southeast zone: Bill McNee (Oshkosh), 920-360-0942, bill.mcnee@wisconsin.gov
  • South Central zone: Michael Hillstrom (Fitchburg, WI), 608-513-7690, michael.hillstrom@wisconsin.gov. Also covering Marathon, Wood, Portage, Adams, Waushara, Marquette and Green Lake counties in the Central zone.
  • Central zone: vacant
Restructured Forest Health zones

Restructured Forest Health zones

A fulltime FH specialist position, which had been vacant, was eliminated as part of the reduction of six positions from the Division of Forestry in the recent state budget. Because of the increased work load on the five remaining FH specialists, the FH program has permanently reduced or eliminated some of its services to customers to keep the staff’s work load at manageable levels.

Program services that have been reduced or eliminated include:

  • The DNR’s gypsy moth suppression program, which addressed population surges in areas of the state where gypsy moth is already established. This program was already in the process of being deactivated when the FH specialist position was cut. (NOTE: The Slow The Spread program, which is managed by the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP), remains active. It targets gypsy moth populations in the western part of the state where gypsy moth has not yet established.)
  • Site visits to confirm EAB at the township level (digital images will be used for identification instead)
  • Site visits and digital diagnostics of small acreage (less than 10 acres) for private landowners

Forest Health team members must also reduce the number of outreach presentations provided to the public.

Please contact Rebecca Gray, Forest Health team leader, with any questions at Rebecca.Gray@wisconsin.gov or by phone at 608-275-3273.

Women of WWOA Spring Gathering May 5th

Wisconsin Woodland Owners Association group of women landowners aka The Women of WWOA, was created to offer educational activities and a supportive atmosphere for women landowners to learn more about caring for their woodlands. The group gathers two to three times a year to spend a day learning from each other and natural resource professionals.

The next gathering will be Saturday, May 5th form 9 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. at Mueller’s Quarry Tree Farm in Arcadia, WI.

Get ready for a fun day of learning, walking, listening, and sharing…

  • Walking the land with UW-Extension Assistant Professor Geology, Jay Zambito. He is currently conducting research in the Arcadia Driftless Area
  • Hot picnic lunch- yum!
  • Meghan Jensen, WDNR Conservation Warden in Trempealeau County will discuss her work and answer questions about woodland concerns.
  • Afternoon sampling in erosion retention ponds with UW-Extension’s Randy Mell.

Part of the day will be indoors and part outside, so dress comfortably for both. Think woods casual- jeans, boots, long sleeves, rain gear, hat, etc.

$20/person includes materials, breaks and lunch. Click here to register.

#FridaysOnTheFarm

Planning Boosts Forest Health and Management

From the kitchen table to the boardroom table, the USDA brings people together across the nation for: healthier food, natural resources and people; a stronger agricultural industry; and economic growth, jobs and innovation.

Each Friday, meet those farmers, producers and landowners through their #Fridaysonthefarm stories. Visit local farms, ranches, forests and resource areas where USDA customers and partners do right and feed everyone.

Click here to read the full story about Jay and Mike Carlson, a father-son team working with NRCS in the Driftless Area to identify management goals that are helping improve the way they manage their forests and its health.

Photo: Honey bees are pollinating wildflowers on the Carlson’s property.

New! Statewide quarantine for emerald ash borer

by Jodie Ellis, Forest Health Team, communications specialist, Jodie.Ellis@wisconsin.gov, 608-266-2172

 An emerald ash borer adult.

An emerald ash borer adult.
Photo: Leah Bauer, USDA Forest Service Northern Research Station, Bugwood.org

A statewide quarantine of the invasive insect emerald ash borer (EAB) will go into effect on March 30, 2018. Previously, individual counties were quarantined when EAB was confirmed within each’s borders. Since EAB has been found in 48 of 72 Wisconsin counties, officials have determined that statewide regulation of the devastating ash tree pest is warranted.

Movement of ash wood, untreated ash products and hardwood firewood of any type to areas outside of Wisconsin will continue to be regulated by USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine. (APHIS PPQ).

Within the state, Wisconsin businesses and members of the public will be able to freely move ash wood, ash products, and hardwood firewood to or from any Wisconsin county. Firewood restrictions will remain in effect on state and federal lands.

Items affected by the statewide EAB quarantine include ash wood with bark attached, larger ash wood chips, and hardwood firewood of any kind. County-by-county quarantines for gypsy moth, another invasive forest pest, remain in effect.

The move to a statewide quarantine does not mean that the state has given up on managing EAB; it is simply a shift in strategy as EAB continues its slow spread through the state. The Wisconsin DNR will continue releasing tiny, stingless wasps -natural enemies of EAB – at appropriate sites, which it has done since 2011. The DNR also continues participation in silvicultural trials in which different ash management strategies are being tested.

Most importantly, campers, tourists, and other members of the public are strongly encouraged to continue taking care when moving firewood within the state. “The actions taken by the Wisconsin public during the last few years have significantly slowed the spread of emerald ash borer and other invasive forest pests in the state,” said Wisconsin DNR EAB program manager Andrea Diss-Torrance. “We can continue to protect the numerous areas within our state that are not yet infested – including those in our own backyards – from tree-killing pests and diseases by following precautions.” Public members should continue to obtain firewood near campgrounds or cabins where they intend to burn it, or buy firewood that bears the DATCP-certified mark, meaning it has been properly seasoned or heat-treated to kill pests.

Emerald ash borer is native to China and probably entered the United States on packing material, showing up first in Michigan in 2002. It was first found in eastern Wisconsin in 2008.

For further information on EAB in Wisconsin, visit https://dnr.wi.gov/, using key words “emerald ash borer”.

Workshop for women landowners only

Join other women landowners on Saturday, April 21st from 9-4 at Kickapoo Valley Reserve in LaFarge, WI. You’ll learn first-hand about creating wildlife habitat, managing invasive species and resources available to help you manage your woods through this valuable workshop and field tour. All knowledge and experience levels welcome. Cost is just $10 and includes lunch and snacks. For more information and to register online visit womenandwoodlands.eventbrite.com

Updated forest health fact sheet – conifer bark beetle

Spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis)

Spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis). Photo: Edward H. Holsten, USDA FS, Bugwood.org

The Division of Forestry’s forest health team recently updated another forest health fact sheet about conifer bark beetles. Like the oak wilt and hickory dieback and mortality fact sheets revised earlier this year, the conifer bark beetle publication offers information about biology, impact, prevention and management of the insects. The conifer bark beetle fact sheet is available on the DNR’s forest health webpage.

Written by: Mike Hillstrom, forest health specialist, Wisconsin Dells. Michael.Hillstrom@Wisconsin.gov; 608-513-7690