Urban Forestry News

People from across the state celebrate trees

In 1872, J. Sterling Morton recognized the power of and need for trees. Morton helped set aside a special day for planting trees. After the success of the first Arbor Day that year, it became a legal holiday and now is celebrated across the world.

There is a lot to celebrate when it comes to trees, they shade us and reduce cooling costs, they help clean our air and water, they create a safe and inviting community, and they beautify our cities, streets and neighborhoods. Continue reading “People from across the state celebrate trees”

Trees clean the air and prevent respiratory illness

May is National Asthma and Allergy Awareness Month. Did you know trees help prevent asthma and other respiratory diseases? Trees filter particles out of the air we breathe, which decreases our risk of respiratory illnesses, including asthma. One study found that in 2010, trees removed 17.4 million tons of air pollution across the US, which prevented 850 human deaths and 670,000 cases of acute respiratory symptoms. Continue reading “Trees clean the air and prevent respiratory illness”

Urban tree identification tool available

By Dan Buckler, Urban Forestry Assessment Specialist

Many guides help you distinguish between a black and a northern red oak, or between a beech and a musclewood. But for many people just trying to identify a tree outside their door, these guides might not be appropriate. Some include too many trees from out-of-state, some focus on trees only found in rural areas, and some others are weighed down by detail.  Continue reading “Urban tree identification tool available”

New, customizable resource shows the value of trees

Money doesn’t grow on trees, or does it?

People know the many benefits that trees can provide – clean our air, beautify our communities, reduce stormwater runoff, and decrease noise pollution – but did you know trees also save you money?  With technology from i-Tree you can calculate how much your trees are saving you.  Now, with a new resource from the USDA Forest Service Urban Natural Resources Institute (UNRI), you can let others know exactly how much your trees are saving you. Continue reading “New, customizable resource shows the value of trees”

EAB found in third Douglas County township

By Paul Cigan, forest health specialist, Hayward, Paul.Cigan@wisconsin.gov, 715-416-4920

Emerald ash borer (EAB) has been confirmed in Highland Township in Douglas County, making it the third township with a known EAB infestation in this county. Utility line professionals reported white ash with heavy woodpecker damage, or “flecking,” that was later confirmed to be an EAB infestation. The extent of damage to the tree suggests that the infestation is approximately 4 years old. Surrounding black ash do not display signs or symptoms of EAB. Nevertheless, based on EAB’s natural rate of spread, there is likely to be a low-density population for about 15 miles around the infested tree in all directions. The nearest previous EAB detection, made in the Town of Amnicon in 2017, is located 23 miles away. Firewood transport is the most likely source of this latest outlying introduction.

Known EAB detections as of April 25, 2019.

Known EAB detections as of April 25, 2019.

Forest managers working with ash should become familiar with the revised EAB Silviculture Guidelines, and landowners and managers in northern counties are encouraged to report EAB suspect trees to their regional forest health specialist.

EAB-infested white ash with heavy woodpecker flecking and dead epicormic sprouts.

EAB-infested white ash with heavy woodpecker flecking and dead epicormic sprouts.

Dense EAB larval galleries on the wood surface of infested white ash.

Dense EAB larval galleries on the wood surface of infested white ash.

Revised EAB insecticide guide now available

By Bill McNee, forest health specialist, Oshkosh, Bill.McNee@wisconsin.gov, 920-360-0942

Title page of revised insecticide guide.The North Central Integrated Pest Management Center has released the third edition of its widely distributed guide, “Insecticide Options for Protecting Ash Trees from Emerald Ash Borer.” This updated document addresses frequently asked questions and shares new information about insecticide options that are not covered in the guide’s previous edition from 2014. To review the most current recommendations and study results regarding insecticide use for EAB, download the report here.

Make trees mean more

Spring is upon us and that means the tree planting season is too. Trees are vital to our environments; they provide individuals and communities with clean air, clean water, reduced cooling costs, safer neighborhoods, and a place to play and gather. But trees provide much more than that, they can help show how much we care for others, a beautiful living reminder of the legacy of a person. Arbor Day is this month, and it is the perfect time to plant a tree and illustrate our feelings for others. Continue reading “Make trees mean more”

DNR awards second round of urban forestry grants

The DNR Urban Forestry Grant program awarded over $70,000 to 3 Wisconsin communities and 1 nonprofit organization for urban forestry projects during our 2019 second round of funding. In order to ensure a pool of catastrophic storm funds throughout the year we award grants in two rounds rather than awarding all funds in December. The communities who received grants in the spring include City of Franklin, City of Milton, City of Oshkosh, and Riveredge Nature Center. Continue reading “DNR awards second round of urban forestry grants”