Is my campfire really a campfire?

The first step in campfire safety is to understand the difference between a campfire and a fire to dispose of debris. Campfires, solely for warming or cooking purposes, are smaller in size and comprised of clean and dry wood, contained within a designated fire ring or surrounded by rocks. Campfires are allowed anytime, except when Emergency Burning Restrictions are in effect. Burning in a fire ring with the intent to eliminate debris is NOT a campfire and does require a burning permit in DNR protection areas.

No matter what type of outdoor fire you have, check the daily burning restrictions for your area before ignition and never leave a fire unattended. Remember, you may be held responsible for all suppression costs and potentially any damages associated.A campfire is no longer a campfire if the intent is to burn debris.

The 2020 Urban Forestry grant application period is now open!

Cities, villages, towns, counties, tribes and 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations in (or conducting their project in) Wisconsin are encouraged to apply for a regular or startup 2020 Department of Natural Resources Urban Forestry Grant! The grants range from $1,000 to $25,000, and grant recipients must match each grant dollar for dollar. A startup grant of up to $5,000 is available for communities that want to start or restart a community forestry program. Grants are awarded to projects that align with state and national goals for increasing the urban forest canopy and the benefits it provides.

Communities and organizations interested in applying for a 2020 Urban Forestry Grant may find the grant application informational video to be a valuable resource. It highlights priorities of the Urban Forestry program and discusses several other key aspects of the application process. The video is approximately eleven minutes long and includes topics such as the difference between startup grants and regular grants and how to contact an Urban Forestry Coordinator.

The application period opened July 1, 2019 and closes October 1, 2019. To view the application and informational video, visit the Urban Forestry Grant’s website. If you have questions regarding application process and eligible projects contact your DNR Urban Forestry Coordinator.

Training – street and park tree management

Once again, the Village of Gays Mills will be providing excellent community forestry training for surrounding partners and cooperators. Workshop attendees will learn basic information to manage and care for their trees throughout their lifespan. Use the brochure found here to register. For any questions, please contact Cindy Kohles, Gays Mills Village Forester, at (608) 872-2184.

2019 First Downs for Trees

Green Bay Packers and DNR staff plant a ceremonial Sterling Linden tree in Titletown to help offset the Green Bay Packer’s carbon footprint produced by traveling to away games. Trees naturally sequester carbon dioxide, providing a long-term solution to the problem because trees sequester more and more carbon as they grow larger. This marks the 9th year of the Packer’s First Downs for Trees (FDFT) Program which has planted 5,144 trees to date throughout Brown County.

DNR Secretary Cole, DNR staff and former Packers Johnnie Gray and Gerry Ellis planting a tree.

DNR Secretary Cole, DNR staff and former Packers Johnnie Gray and Gerry Ellis planting a tree.

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Wisconsin DNR Urban Forestry News subscriber survey

Introduction

Providing timely and relevant information to the Wisconsin urban forestry community is a key role of the Wisconsin DNR Urban Forestry program. One of the ways in which this goal manifests itself is through a monthly newsletter received by 5,555 subscribers (May 2019). In order to ensure that the newsletter content is relevant and timely, the Urban Forestry program surveyed subscribers in spring 2019. Results are shown and interpreted below and suggestions made for future newsletter editions. Continue reading “Wisconsin DNR Urban Forestry News subscriber survey”

Professionally-designed HRD guidelines now available

Cover page of HRD guidelines documentThe professionally-designed version of the Heterobasidion root disease (HRD) stump treatment guidelines is now posted on the DNR’s HRD webpage. The revised stump treatment guidelines, developed to reduce the risk of introduction and spread of HRD in Wisconsin, were implemented January 1, 2019. The content is the same as the guidelines that were approved last year, but this document has a layout that is much more user-friendly. Explore the new look of the HRD guidelines.

 

Watch for signs of oak wilt

Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Woodruff, Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov, 920-360-0665 

Trees in the red oak group (those with points on their leaves) that were infected with the oak wilt fungus this spring will rapidly drop their leaves from July to September and be dead by fall. This wilting and dropping of the green leaves happens quickly. Once it starts, the tree will drop most of its leaves within just a few weeks.

Tree dying from oak wilt with rapidly dropping leaves.

Tree dying from oak wilt with rapidly dropping leaves. The tree was injured in May, attracting the beetles that help spread the fungus, and the tree was dead by the end of the year. Photo was taken in August.

Red oak leaf from infected tree. Leaves are often green at the base, with the outer portions of the leaf appearing water-soaked or brownish.

Red oak leaf from infected tree. Leaves are often green at the base, with the outer portions of the leaf appearing water-soaked or brownish.

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Ants, aphids and sooty mold on white pine

Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Woodruff, Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov, 920-360-0665

Ants, aphids, and sooty mold can cause stunting and death of young white pines, but fortunately there are some steps you can take to protect your trees from these pests.

Ants guard aphids from predators as they feed. In exchange, the ants collect the sweet honeydew excreted by the aphids.

Ants (upper right) guard aphids from predators as they feed. In exchange, the ants collect the sweet honeydew excreted by the aphids.

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Watch for cherry scallop shell moth defoliation

Mike Hillstrom, forest health specialist, Fitchburg, Michael.Hillstrom@wisconsin.gov, 608-513-7690

Cherry scallop shell moth, a native defoliator, is back again in Jefferson and Walworth counties. Several residents recently reported large numbers of moths in areas that have experienced multiple years of defoliation by this insect.

Eggs laid by those moths are expected to hatch soon, and the emerging caterpillars will begin feeding on cherry tree foliage. Hopefully, populations of egg-parasitizing natural enemies will be high enough this year to provide relief to stressed trees.

Early instar caterpillars on cherry leaf.

Early instar caterpillars on cherry leaf.

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