Emerald ash borer new locations in Wisconsin

EAB quarantine map. Counties shaded in tan are quarantined for EAB, and include much of the southern half of Wisconsin, as well as other counties. Areas shaded in green are the townships and municipalities where EAB has actually been identified, and shows that not all counties that are quarantined are fully infested.

EAB quarantine map. Counties shaded in tan are quarantined for EAB, green areas are townships and municipalities where EAB has actually been identified.

Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) continues to be found in new areas. Wisconsin continues to track EAB at the municipality or township level; quarantine counties are shown in tan and infested areas are shown in green on the map.

If you know you have EAB, please contact us with that information so we can verify the infestation and update the maps. If your area:

  • is not shaded in green on the map please contact DNR or
  • is not shaded at all on the map please contact DATCP.

You can reach both agencies from the menu options when you call 1-800-462-2803.

New county quarantines

  • none

New finds in counties already quarantined

  • Brown County — village of Bellevue
  • Door County — village of Egg Harbor
  • Fond du Lac County — village of Rosendale and town of Springvale
  • Vernon County — town of Franklin

Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172.

Porcupine and squirrel damage

Porcupine damage on red pine trunk.

Porcupine damage to red pine.

Porcupines and squirrels damage trees by eating the bark. Sometimes they remove large areas of bark on branches as well as on the main stem. On sunny days the pale wood where the bark has been stripped off really stands out in the woods.

This type of feeding can remove enough bark to girdle the branches or the main stem, causing the tree to die from that point to the end of the branch. Branches that are not completely girdled will continue to grow and callus tissue will begin to grow over the wounds. If branches are nearly girdled, they may leaf out in the spring only to have the leaves suddenly wilt and die as hot weather hits because the tree can’t move enough water to keep the leaves alive. Continue reading “Porcupine and squirrel damage”

Slime molds and yeasts are bright and slimy

Several reports have recently come in of bright orange slime on trees or on mulch in Brown, Door and Shawano counties. Slime molds and yeasts can make bright colors, usually pink, orange, or yellow. Don’t panic – they don’t harm the tree. Often the orange, slimy areas on trees are associated with sapsucker wounds, where the tree has been bleeding sap on which microorganisms are growing. We see these most during the spring when the weather is moist, but once the weather warms the slime will dry up, leaving just a faint orange tinge to the tree where they were.

Sapsuckers wound trees and return to lick the sap that oozes from the wounds.

Sapsuckers wound trees and return to lick the sap that oozes from the wounds.

A stump is covered by orange slime. Slime molds and yeasts can be orange, pink, or yellow.

Slime molds and yeasts can be orange, pink, or yellow. Photo by: Gerald Vomastic

 

Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172.

Phomopsis galls on northern red oak

Phomopsis galls are woody, lumpy swellings on the branches and main stem of this northern red oak tree.

Northern red oak with many phomopsis galls on the branches and on the main stem.

Phomopsis galls are large, woody galls caused by a fungus and can be unsightly on the branches of trees (people often notice them in the winter when leaves are off). They occur in hickories, maples, oaks and a few other species. In northeastern Wisconsin, I find them most commonly on hickory, but in some areas northern red oaks can be heavily galled. Counties where I’ve seen these large galls on northern red oak include Oconto, Oneida, Shawano and Vilas. Continue reading “Phomopsis galls on northern red oak”

Eastern spruce dwarf mistletoe

Eastern spruce dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum), is a parasitic flowering plant that can be very damaging to black spruce, although it can also attack other spruces. Occasionally you’ll see it on other species growing amidst spruce such as tamarack, white pine, red pine, jack pine, or balsam fir. Continue reading “Eastern spruce dwarf mistletoe”

Forest tent caterpillar update

Forest tent caterpillars do not make web nests but may congregate and rest in groups on the bark.

Forest tent caterpillars do not make web nests but may congregate and rest in groups on the bark.

Caterpillars hatch from the eggs of a forest tent caterpillar egg mass.

Caterpillars hatch from the eggs of a forest tent caterpillar egg mass.

Forest tent caterpillars are hatching. Egg mass surveys were conducted in Iron, Ashland, Bayfield, Sawyer, Polk, Washburn, Douglas and Burnett counties, and no egg masses were observed. Surveys in Vilas, Oneida and Forest counties found very few egg masses.

Based on this information we expect low numbers and minimal defoliation again this year, but please let us know if you see forested areas with more significant defoliation.

Written by: Linda Williams, forest health specialist, Green Bay, (Linda.Williams@wisconsin.gov), 920-662-5172.

 

UW-Stevens Point students gain real world skills while helping communities

In an attempt to find an avenue to get small communities in the fold of beginning, or better managing their community tree resources DNR Regional Urban Forestry (UF) Coordinator, Don Kissinger, resurrected memories of his college days when he and his classmates were given a computer simulation to react and manage a fictitious community forestry program. Through this attempt the collaboration with UW- Stevens Point Professor Rich Hauer and his senior level Urban Forestry Lab class began.

Continue reading “UW-Stevens Point students gain real world skills while helping communities”