Invasive plant

#FridaysOnTheFarm

Planning Boosts Forest Health and Management

From the kitchen table to the boardroom table, the USDA brings people together across the nation for: healthier food, natural resources and people; a stronger agricultural industry; and economic growth, jobs and innovation.

Each Friday, meet those farmers, producers and landowners through their #Fridaysonthefarm stories. Visit local farms, ranches, forests and resource areas where USDA customers and partners do right and feed everyone.

Click here to read the full story about Jay and Mike Carlson, a father-son team working with NRCS in the Driftless Area to identify management goals that are helping improve the way they manage their forests and its health.

Photo: Honey bees are pollinating wildflowers on the Carlson’s property.

Be on the lookout for lesser celandine

By Michael Putnam, DNR invasive plants specialist (Madison), Michael.Putnam@wisconsin.gov, 608-266-7596

Lesser celandine flower

Lesser celandine flower. Photo: Wikimedia

Lesser celandine (Ranunculus ficaria) is an invasive forest plant that been found in urban forests in southeastern Wisconsin. The plant has a history of taking over forest floors in the eastern U. S. and crowding out native plants and tree seedlings. Consequently, lesser celandine is listed as a Prohibited Species under the state’s invasive species law NR 40, and cannot be transported, sold, introduced or possessed in Wisconsin.

DNR is undertaking control projects in Dane, Milwaukee, Racine and Kenosha counties – four of the six counties where lesser celandine is known to occur – and will be conducting surveys in the remaining two counties, Walworth and Waukesha, to inform future control efforts.

Lesser celandine with reproductive bulbils

Lesser celandine with reproductive bulbils Photo: DNR photo

Lesser celandine starts growing in early spring, with bright yellow flowers appearing in April. It dies back by the end of June. This low-growing plant has shiny, waxy leaves that are kidney or heart-shaped. Small spherical bulbils that form along the stems drop off to give rise to new plants, while underground tubers sustain the plant after it dies back. Because of its short growing season, DNR depends on reports from the public to identify new populations to plan accordingly. If you encounter this plant, please report it at Invasive.Species@wi.gov.

 

Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum)

Giant hogweed. Photo by Donna Ellis.

Giant hogweed. Photo by Donna Ellis.

Giant hogweed can be a threat to human health. Its sap has Furocoumarins (photosensitizing compounds) that can cause a skin reaction known as phyto-photodermatitis. This makes the skin highly sensitive to ultraviolet light. Swelling and blistering of the skin may lead to permanent scarring, and contact with the eyes can cause temporary and sometimes permanent blindness.

In Wisconsin, giant hogweed is classified as a prohibited species under the Invasive Species Rule (Wis. Adm. Code ch. NR 40). Its presence potentially causes economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. Isolated populations of Giant hogweed have been found in Wisconsin with immediate control taking place after verification.  Continue reading “Giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum)”

Amur cork tree is an emerging threat to Wisconsin forests.

Amur cork tree (Phellodendron amurense) is a relatively new invasive plant found in at least four Wisconsin counties. It is classified as Prohibited under Wisconsin’s invasive species law, NR 40. The female cork tree cannot be possessed, transferred, transported or introduced in Wisconsin. We ask that you report this tree to DNR because it is invasive here and in other states and DNR is mounting control efforts before it becomes widespread. DNR works with property owners to achieve this by providing advice, tools and resource opportunities. Continue reading “Amur cork tree is an emerging threat to Wisconsin forests.”

Lesser celandine is an emerging threat to Wisconsin forests – be on the lookout.

Spherical bulbils of lesser celandine form during the spring growing season. Later they drop off and sprout to form new plants.

Spherical bulbils of lesser celandine form during the spring growing season. Later they drop off and sprout to form new plants.

Lesser celandine (Ranunculus ficaria), also known as fig buttercup, is a ground layer plant and an aggressive invader of forests in North America. So far, it is relatively unknown in Wisconsin but has been found in the southeastern part of the state, especially in moist (mesic and wet-mesic) forests and along river banks.

Lesser celandine is a spring ephemeral that emerges in early spring, develops flowers, dies back by early summer, and remains dormant in underground tubers. During the short growing period the plant produces bulbils which sprout and give rise to new plants. After the round bulbils drop off they are spread by gravity, water, small animals, and like the tubers, transported when soil is moved. Continue reading “Lesser celandine is an emerging threat to Wisconsin forests – be on the lookout.”

Financial assistance is available for controlling invasive species.

Looking for a financial assist in your efforts to control invasive species?

The Wisconsin Invasive Species Council website lists 61 different grant opportunities that are available from Federal and State agencies as well as private foundations. The list is searchable by applicant (tribe, government agency, company, non-profit, individual) and type of invasive organism (plant, animal, aquatic, invertebrate, disease). All but one has a link that takes you to more information or a contact person.

Why not take a few moments to explore these opportunities?

Written by: Michael Putnam, invasive plants program specialist, Madison (Michael.Putnam@wisconsin.gov), 608-266-7596.

Apply for 2016 Great Lakes grant

The U.S. Forest Service has announced that they are accepting proposals for potential grant funding. There are $575,000 in new funds that are available for Cooperative Weed Management Areas (CWMA) in the Great Lakes Basin. The deadline for approval is January 6, 2017 at grants.gov. The goal of the program is to detect, prevent, eradicate and/or control invasive plants to promote diverse benefits on Federal, State or private land. Continue reading “Apply for 2016 Great Lakes grant”