Author: Ellen Clark

Arbor Day: Show your appreciation

“When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect.” Aldo Leopold spoke these words many years ago, but they still ring true today. We all belong to a community, built around the people and the places we love and feel connected to, including trees and the land. Trees help shape communities and create sentimental landmarks that connect people and places. Consider the large elm that may hold a family tire swing, or the oak that made the perfect place for a secret club house, perhaps it’s under a crabapple tree that a couple shared their first kiss, trees becomes fixtures in our lives, bookmarks for the moments we relish.

Continue reading “Arbor Day: Show your appreciation”

Canopy cover assessed for all Wisconsin municipalities and urban areas

By Dan Buckler, Urban Forest Assessment Specialist, DNR

Whether you see urban trees as art, infrastructure or the lungs of your community, they are important assets in our state. And recently released tree canopy data from the DNR’s Urban Forestry program shows exactly where those trees and other woody vegetation exist in the state’s municipalities and urban areas. Continue reading “Canopy cover assessed for all Wisconsin municipalities and urban areas”

A Glimpse into New Berlin’s Tree Canopy

By Dan Buckler, Urban Forestry Assessment Specialist, DNR

The Urban Forestry program’s recently released Urban Tree Canopy data shows the extent of tree and shrub cover across every Wisconsin municipality and urban area. The City of New Berlin in southeast Wisconsin offers a glimpse into the kind of information you could derive from the canopy data. Continue reading “A Glimpse into New Berlin’s Tree Canopy”

Community Tree Management Institute: Building on a solid foundation

By Olivia Witthun, Urban Forestry Coordinator

CTMI students learningThe second of three sessions for Wisconsin’s Community Tree Management Institute (CTMI) was held February 6-7, 2018 in Green Lake. Through hands-on training and exercises, twenty-six students from across the state learned how to identify community forestry management needs and get the work done. Topics included: inventories, management plans, urban and community forestry operations (planting, pruning and removal), natural areas, tree biology, hardscape conflicts, soils, risk tree management and tree emergencies. Instructors for session II included: municipal forestry staff, university staff, consultants and DNR staff. The variety of instructors, their perspectives and interactive components are meant to appeal to all learning styles. Continue reading “Community Tree Management Institute: Building on a solid foundation”

2018 WAA/DNR Conference was an immense success

WAA exhibit hallThe 2018 WAA/DNR Annual Conference was held February 18-20 in Green Bay, Wisconsin. This year there was a record attendance of 857 people. Those in attendance were from the private industry, business owners, municipal staff, and state employees. Again, this year there were several different tracks attendants could attend: general sessions, climbers corner, introductory, business and utility. Across these tracks many topics were covered, from insects and pests to climbing and building an arboriculture business. This three-day conference also hosted many different exhibitors from the industry to provide attendees with up-to-date technology, equipment and practices to improve their work. Continue reading “2018 WAA/DNR Conference was an immense success”

Building a Community Ecology Project

Contents of this article are shared for informational purposes only. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources does not endorse and makes no representations, expressed, inferred or implied, concerning these organizations, programs or services.

By Paul Fliss, City Forester, City of New Berlin, WI

The City of New Berlin applied for a National Fish and Wildlife Federation (NFWF) Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Grant in 2017. The proposed project will cover 9.59 acres and encompass the length of Deer Creek and the wetlands to the south and east of the City Center Business District. Common to this area are several species of resident birds, migratory songbirds, owls and waterfowl. Recent history has revealed an abundance of whitetail deer and smaller animals such as muskrats, raccoon, opossum, skunks, various mice/voles and even evidence of a beaver. The habitat for these species is that of an urban to rural interface and wetland transition ecology. The current state of the defined proposal areas vary between ‘poor’ with construction debris, litter and heavily infested invasive species to ‘fair’ with few invasive species and nearly undisturbed lowland habitat, native trees and wetlands plants. Continue reading “Building a Community Ecology Project”

Is your city a Bird, Bee or Tree City?

Greenfield Arbor Day eventRight now, you’re probably sitting in your office, trying to stay warm and planning for the year ahead. Be sure to check out the following recognition programs and pass the information along to committee and boards who would be interested. The great part is that a single project could be used to help meet all three programs’ requirements! Also be sure to check out amazing trainings that are being offered throughout the state. Continue reading “Is your city a Bird, Bee or Tree City?”