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Fireworks can cause wildfires

Fireworks can cause wildfires.  Don's let your fun turn into flames.Forestry officials suggest caution with fireworks
By: Amy Luebke, DNR

Each year the use of both legal and illegal fireworks causes wildfires in Wisconsin.  Anyone using legal fireworks should do so only in a clear area away from buildings, vehicles and shrubbery and should have water or a fire extinguisher handy.  Remember that wildfires can occur anytime the ground is not snow covered.  Make sure you are aware of your local weather conditions and plan accordingly.  Fireworks can cause wildfires.  Don’t let your fun turn into flames!

Wildfire Report 5-16-19

Torching pine during a wildfire.

Lower moisture levels in pines increase the possibility for torching pines.

A total of 51 wildfires burned in DNR Protection Areas over the past week, burning 86 acres. The majority of the fires were caused by debris burning, with several railroad and powerline fires. Four structures were threatened and all four were saved. One significant wildfire occurred in the Woodruff Area and burned approximately 40 acres before containment. Widespread rain is expected across the state into the weekend.

As starch and carbohydrate levels build up in our red and jack pine species, their moisture levels will drop significantly. Over the next week, we will be at the low point of this moisture level, and the possibility is highest for torching pines and surface fires transitioning to crown fire activity. There is also still plenty of dead grass and fallen leaves on the land that makes it easy for a wildfire to start and spread. Stay apprised of fire weather conditions by checking the DNR fire danger webpage each day after 11 a.m.: dnr.wi.gov, keyword “‘fire”.

Firewise Tip: Make sure your burn sites are completely out and not retaining heat before leaving the area!

Wildfire Alert

Fire danger is at High to Very High today, May 15 in several areas.  The WI DNR is suspending burning permits for debris piles and broadcast burns in many counties due to forecasted winds, low humidity and dry vegetation.  Please use caution outdoors with anything that could cause a spark including chainsaws, dragging trailer chains, and even hot exhaust systems from off-road vehicles.  For the current fire restrictions, visit https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/ForestFire/restrictions.html

May 2, 2019 Wildfire Report

Wildfire Report for May 2, 2019

Widespread precipitation has kept wildfire activity low lately. In the past week, 63 wildfires burned 54 acres in DNR protection areas (approximately half the state); 35 homes and other buildings were threatened but saved with firefighter assistance and 3 buildings were destroyed.  Debris burning was the most common cause (30 fires); equipment was the second most common cause (17 fires). Other minor causes included power line, campfires, and ash disposal. As the vegetation dries out on the days we don’t receive rain, expect fire danger to increase, particularly in areas where standing dead grass and other dry vegetation remains.

If you choose to conduct outdoor burning, remember that a free annual burning permit is required to burn small piles of debris and to burn in a burn barrel in DNR protection areas. Burning permits are frequently suspended this time of year when fire danger increases. You must check the day’s burning restrictions every day you intend to burn by calling 1-888-WIS-BURN (947-2876) or by checking online at dnr.wi.gov, keyword ‘fire danger’.  Larger piles and daytime burning requires a special permit from a DNR Ranger. Piling your debris in a campfire pit does not make it okay to burn during the day.  If your property is outside a DNR protection area, check with local officials for burning restrictions.

Leaf and needle debris under decks can ignite and start the deck and house on fire.

Remove leaves and needles from your roof, around your foundation and under your deck to prevent ignition by a flying ember.

Firewise Tip: Homeowners are encouraged to make weekly checks around your home or cabin for windblown leaves and needles on your roof, around your foundation, and under decks and elevated porches; keep these areas clean. The debris that collects in these places could be easily ignited by flying embers produced during a wildfire.

Increased fire danger on April 26th

Increased fire danger

Expect to see strong, gusty winds today (Friday, April 26) ahead of a storm front as fire danger ranges from High to Very High statewide. There are burning permit suspensions in 27 counties. Check burning permit restrictions at dnr.wi.gov, keyword “fire.” Sparks from campfires, hot equipment, woodstove ashes also a concern today, until the rain or snow arrives and winds are calm.  Fire crews will be on high alert and shifting ground resources in areas of elevated risk.   In addition, three contract single-engine air tankers are on stand-by for quick initial attack, stationed in Necedah and Siren. Report fires early by dialing 911.  Check fire restrictions here.

Prevent a wildfire

Wildfire Prevention Week

Embers can remain hot for days and start a wildfire.

Never leave your fire unattended and make sure it’s completely out before you leave.

It’s Wildfire Prevention Week!
One way you can help us celebrate, is to get a free DNR burn permit before burning.  It takes less than two minutes and we can email you the burn permit right away.  Or, call our hotline 1-888-WIS-BURN (947-2876) and customer service can issue you one over the phone. Then, on the day of the burn, call or check online for the fire danger and burn restrictions in your county after 11 am.  Never leave your fire unattended and make sure it’s completely out before you leave. Got questions or not in an area where the DNR regulates?  Local fire officials are always willing to help.  Following these simple steps can greatly decrease your chances of starting a wildfire.  Visit this page to get your free DNR burn permit.

 

Wildfire Report for April 25, 2019

Debris burning caused half of Wisconsin's wildfires last week.  Burn barrels use is one form of debris burning.

Half the fires last week were caused by debris burning.

Last week 72 wildfires burned 177 acres in DNR Protection Areas;. Half of the fires were caused by debris burning (brush and leaf piles, burn barrel use, burning household trash and broadcast burning).  Other minor causes included campfires, equipment, power line and improper ash disposal. Forty buildings were threatened by wildfires but saved by fire suppression actions; four were destroyed.

The DNR wants to remind everyone to be careful with anything that can start a wildfire when you’re out fishing, hunting, camping, doing yard work, or looking for mushrooms. Fire danger can vary greatly from one day to the next this time of the year, depending on weather and dryness of the vegetation. Check this site for current statewide fire danger and burning permit restrictions: dnr.wi.gov (search ‘fire danger’).

Firewise Tip: Wondering if your home is in an area at risk for wildfire? Go through our checklist and find out.

Wildfire Report for April 18, 2019

Last week 14 wildfires burned 39 acres in DNR Protection Areas; nine of the fires were caused by debris burning. Five buildings were threatened by wildfires, but saved by fire suppression actions; one was destroyed. Snow is quickly melting in parts of the state that still have partial snow cover. This time of year there is still a great deal of dead vegetation that dries out quickly and is available fuel for a wildfire. Low relative humidity, warm temps, and gusty winds quickly drive up the fire danger. Stay aware of fire danger and burning restrictions by calling 1-888-WIS-BURN (947-2876) or check online at dnr.wi.gov, keyword “fire”. Curious about where wildfires are actively burning? Check out our fire activity webpage at dnr.wi.gov, keyword “fire” and click on “View current wildfire activity.”

A campfire can quickly become a wildfire on a windy day.

A warming or cooking fire on a windy day can quickly become an out of control wildfire.

Firewise Tip: Turkey hunters are reminded to be extra cautious with anything that can start a wildfire when you’re outdoors. Be especially mindful of the weather. A warming or cooking fire on a windy day can quickly become an out of control wildfire.

Wildfire Report

A total of 26 wildfires burned in DNR Protection Areas over the past week, burning 73 acres. Half of the fires were caused by debris burning. Eleven buildings were threatened and one was destroyed. Widespread rain and snow then lowered fire danger across the state.

Burning brush when the ground is completely snow covered.

The safest time to burn leaves, brush and pine needles is when the ground is completely snow-covered.

Spring is wildfire season and it’s important to remember that storm systems bringing snow and rain give a short reprieve in fire danger. While burning debris should always be your last alternative, the safest time to burn leaves, brush and pine needles is when the ground is completely snow-covered and will remain so for the duration of the burn.

As we dry out, expect fire danger to increase. There is plenty of dead grass and fallen leaves on the land that makes it easy for a wildfire to start and spread. Stay apprised of fire weather conditions by checking the DNR fire danger webpage each day after 11 a.m.: dnr.wi.gov, keyword “‘fire”.

Firewise Tip: Remove leaves and other debris that has accumulated next to buildings, in lawns, and on and under decks. Take special care to clean out dead material from evergreen shrubs near buildings. Compost these materials or take to a leaf collection site.

Wildfire Report

WILDFIRE REPORT FOR APRIL 4, 2019

Fire season is upon us. Each year an estimated 1,100 wildfires burn in DNR protection areas (about half the state, generally the more forested areas) and another estimated 2,500 wildfires burn in parts of the state where fire departments are the primary responders. Two-thirds of these fires occur in spring. There is a great deal of dry vegetation and fallen leaves and other debris present this time of year, which is quick to dry out. Accompanied by warmer weather, drops in humidity and gusty winds, wildfires can quickly ignite and spread. So far this year,75 fires have occurred, burning 569 acres. Main fire causes have been debris burning and equipment; 25 structures have been threatened by these fires and 2 buildings have been destroyed.

With the nicer weather, homeowners are cleaning up around their properties, sometimes choosing to burn leaves and branch debris. Debris burning is the leading cause of wildfires, especially this time of year. Burning is not your only option. Try alternatives such as composting or leaving brush in the woods for wildlife cover. The best practice is to not burn at all or to wait until surrounding vegetation greens-up in the summer. If you wish to burn, get a burning permit and follow the rules of the day. You can stay aware of fire danger and burning permit requirements by checking our website dnr.wi.gov, keyword “fire” or calling 1-888-WIS-BURN. Information is updated each day at 11 a.m.

Firewood stacked at least 30 feet from the home

Move firewood at least 30 feet away from your home.

Firewise Tip:  If you burn wood for home heating, it’s time to move any remaining firewood stacked near your home to a spot that’s at least 30 feet away. If you dump wood ash outdoors, spread the ash in an area free of vegetation and debris and drown with water to make sure any hidden embers are fully extinguished. Or leave the ash in a metal bucket with a tight- fitting lid until it is completely cool.