Archives

Chainsaw safety training

Chainsaw safety training will be held this fall at Riveredge Nature Center near Newburg, WI.

Join Safety and Woods Worker (SAWW) trainer Luke Saunders (forester with Adaptive Restoration LLC) for a hands-on training in chainsaw use, maintenance and technique. Spend time both outside and in the classroom practicing how to operate chainsaws safely, comfortably and productively.

Chainsaw and tree felling demonstration

There will be two training levels offered on different dates. Level 1 chainsaw training will be held November 5 and level 2 will be held on November 11. Please note that you must have completed level 1 before enrolling in level 2.

Please see below for more details and to register:

Grant opportunity: Urban Wildlife Damage Abatement and Control Grant

Urban Wildlife Damage Abatement and Control (UWDAC) grants help urban areas develop wildlife plans, implement specific damage abatement and/or control measures for white-tailed deer and/or Canada geese.Images of deer and geese - two wildlife species that cause damage in urban environments

UWDAC grants are available to any town, city, village, county or tribal government located within an urban area. Applications must be received on or before December 1 and awards are announced in January of the grant year. For more information please visit, https://dnr.wi.gov/aid/uwdac.html

Grant Opportunity – Community Forest & Open Space Conservation Program

The Community Forest and Open Space Conservation Program grant period is open. This is a competitive grant program through the USDA Forest Service whereby local governments, qualified nonprofit organizations and Native American tribes are eligible for grants to establish community forests through fee simple acquisition of private forest land from a willing seller.  Continue reading “Grant Opportunity – Community Forest & Open Space Conservation Program”

Community Tree Management Institute – Graduate Workshop II

Twenty-one Community Tree Management Institute (CTMI) graduates from communities across Wisconsin came together on two of the most beautiful days in September to participate in the Graduate Workshop II. This training and hands-on practice directly increases a community’s capacity to effectively manage its tree program.Discussing tree characteristics at workshop Continue reading “Community Tree Management Institute – Graduate Workshop II”

Fall is a great time to look for HRD

By Mike Hillstrom, forest health specialist, Fitchburg, Michael.Hillstrom@wisconsin.gov, 608-513-7690

Considered one of the most destructive diseases of conifers in the northern hemisphere, HRD is very difficult to eradicate once established. Infestation of a conifer stand may significantly impact stand management, making early detection of the disease extremely important.

new white growth on old HRD conk

HRD fruit body with new white growth on infested stump. Credit: DNR Forest Health.

Continue reading “Fall is a great time to look for HRD”

Oak health issues in summer 2019

By Mike Hillstrom, forest health specialist, Fitchburg, Michael.Hillstrom@wisconsin.gov, 608-513-7690

The most commonly reported forest health issue in recent weeks has been unhealthy looking oaks. Symptoms ranging from rapid mortality to gradual decline to superficial have been observed on all species of oak this summer.

affected oak tree with dead leaves in lower half of crown

White and bur oaks are being impacted by a variety of health issues in late summer 2019, including fungal leaf infections and bur oak blight. Symptoms are most severe in the lower half of this tree’s canopy. Credit: DNR Forest Health.

Continue reading “Oak health issues in summer 2019”

It’s Firewood Awareness Month: do you know what your options are?

By Andrea Diss-Torrance, invasive forest insects program coordinator, Andrea.DissTorrance@wisconsin.gov, 608-516-2223

Most people know that using locally-sourced firewood helps prevent the spread of invasive pests and diseases. What may be less well known are the processes for finding local sources of firewood or learning where and how you can collect it yourself. During Firewood Awareness Month, we want to share what options are out there so you can take steps to protect the places you love.

Firewood isn't dead - infested firewood can carry insects and diseases to new places

Infested firewood can carry invasive insects and diseases to new places. Buy or gather firewood where you will use it or buy firewood that has been certified as heat-treated and free of pests and diseases. Credit: dontmovefirewood.org.

Continue reading “It’s Firewood Awareness Month: do you know what your options are?”